Langue française

  • She said

    ,

    • Alisio
    • 29 Septembre 2020

    « Après les révélations des accusations de harcèlement et d'abus sexuels à l'encontre de Harvey Weinstein, [...] nous assistâmes, ébahies, à la rupture d'une digue. Des millions de femmes à travers le monde témoignèrent des mauvais traitements qu'elles avaient elles aussi subis. Un nombre incalculable d'hommes durent soudain répondre de leur comportement [...]. Notre travail de journalistes contribua à déclencher une rupture sans précédent. » Le 5 octobre 2017, le New York Times publiait un article de Jodi Kantor et Megan Twohey qui allait changer le monde. Enquêtant sur des allégations inquiétantes, les deux journalistes avaient, des mois durant, secrètement rencontré et persuadé des victimes de Harvey Weinstein de témoigner. Actrices, anciennes employées du producteur, célébrités ou inconnues, de nombreuses femmes qui s'étaient jusque-là tues prirent la parole dans le monde entier. Cet ouvrage est le récit haletant de l'investigation qui enflamma le mouvement #MeToo à l'échelle planétaire.

    « Une histoire de journalisme [...] courageux qui fit aux patriarches d'Hollywood ce que Bob Woodward et Carl Bernstein firent à l'administration Nixon. » THE TIMES « Deux [autrices] que les générations futures retrouveront dans les livres d'histoire. » MASHABLE

  • 'Feels like a Hollywood film in the making' DAILY TELEGRAPH 'Essential' MARGARET ATWOOD 'Cinematic, remarkable' GUARDIAN 'Totally gripping' JON RONSON 'Has the morally satisfying arc of a thriller, with all the suspense. For lovers of Spotlight ' i 'Seismic. Examines what happens when a bully is cornered' OBSERVER 'Incredible. It staggered me. I could talk all day about this book' PANDORA SYKES 'Unputdownable non-fiction. A powerful book' RENI EDDO-LODGE ' All the President's Men for the #MeToo era' WASHINGTON POST 'A binge-read of a book. Adrenaline-spiking' LOS ANGELES TIMES On 5 October 2017, the New York Times published an article by Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey that helped change the world.

    Hollywood was talking as never before. Kantor and Twohey outmanoeuvred Harvey Weinstein, his team of defenders and private investigators, convincing some of the most famous women in the world - and some unknown ones - to go on the record.

    This is how they did it.
    ___________________________ For months ahead of the story breaking, Kantor and Twohey had been having confidential discussions with top actresses, former Weinstein employees and other sources, learning of disturbing, long-buried allegations. The journalists meticulously picked their way through a web of decades-old secret payouts and non-disclosure agreements, pressed some of the most famous women in the world - and some unknown ones - to risk going on the record, and faced down Weinstein, his team of high-priced defenders, and even his private investigators.

    In She Said , Kantor and Twohey relive in real-time what it took to break the story and give an up-close portrait of the forces they were up against. They describe the experiences of the women who spoke up - for the sake of other women, for future generations, and for themselves.

    Their stories have never been told in this way before.

  • From the Pulitzer-prize winning reporters who broke the news of Harvey Weinstein's sexual harassment and abuse for the New York Times , Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, the thrilling untold story of their investigation and its consequences for the #MeToo movement On October 5, 2017, the New York Times published an article by Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey--and then the world changed. For months Kantor and Twohey had been having confidential discussions with top actresses, former Weinstein employees and other sources, learning of disturbing long-buried allegations, some of which had been covered up by onerous legal settlements. The journalists meticulously picked their way through a web of decades-old secret payouts and nondisclosure agreements, pressed some of the most famous women in the world--and some unknown ones--to risk going on the record, and faced down Weinstein, his team of high-priced defenders, and even his private investigators. But nothing could have prepared them for what followed the publication of their Weinstein story. Within days, a veritable Pandora's Box of sexual harassment and abuse was opened, and women who had suffered in silence for generations began coming forward, trusting that the world would understand their stories. Over the next twelve months, hundreds of men from every walk of life and industry would be outed for mistreating their colleagues. But did too much change--or not enough? Those questions plunged the two journalists into a new phase of reporting and some of their most startling findings yet. ;;;; With superlative detail, insight, and journalistic expertise, Kantor and Twohey take us for the first time into the very heart of this social shift, reliving in real-time what it took to get the story and giving an up-close portrait of the forces that hindered and spurred change. They describe the surprising journeys of those who spoke up--for the sake of other women, for future generations, and for themselves--and so changed us all.

  • 'Feels like a Hollywood film in the making' DAILY TELEGRAPH 'Essential' MARGARET ATWOOD 'Cinematic, remarkable' GUARDIAN 'Totally gripping' JON RONSON 'Has the morally satisfying arc of a thriller, with all the suspense. For lovers of Spotlight ' i 'Seismic. Examines what happens when a bully is cornered' OBSERVER 'Incredible. It staggered me. I could talk all day about this book' PANDORA SYKES 'Unputdownable non-fiction. A powerful book' RENI EDDO-LODGE ' All the President's Men for the #MeToo era' WASHINGTON POST 'A binge-read of a book. Adrenaline-spiking' LOS ANGELES TIMES On 5 October 2017, the New York Times published an article by Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey that helped change the world.

    Hollywood was talking as never before. Kantor and Twohey outmanoeuvred Harvey Weinstein, his team of defenders and private investigators, convincing some of the most famous women in the world - and some unknown ones - to go on the record.

    This is how they did it.
    ___________________________ For months ahead of the story breaking, Kantor and Twohey had been having confidential discussions with top actresses, former Weinstein employees and other sources, learning of disturbing, long-buried allegations. The journalists meticulously picked their way through a web of decades-old secret payouts and non-disclosure agreements, pressed some of the most famous women in the world - and some unknown ones - to risk going on the record, and faced down Weinstein, his team of high-priced defenders, and even his private investigators.

    In She Said , Kantor and Twohey relive in real-time what it took to break the story and give an up-close portrait of the forces they were up against. They describe the experiences of the women who spoke up - for the sake of other women, for future generations, and for themselves.

    Their stories have never been told in this way before.

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