Entreprise, économie & droit

  • Why do we do what we do? Why do we exist? Learning to ask these questions can unlock the secret to inspirational business. This title explains what it truly takes to lead and inspire and how you can learn how to do it.

  • Anglais Quest, the

    Daniel Yergin

    Shows us how energy is the ultimate engine of global political and economic change, in a story that spans the old energies on which our civilization has been built, the new energies that are competing to replace them, and the battle over climate change. This book reveals the decisions, technologies, and individuals that are shaping our future.

  • Jeffrey Sachs draws on his remarkable 25 years' experience to offer a thrilling and inspiring vision of the keys to economic success in the world today.

  • Oil makes the world work. It has become so vital that even a small reduction in output can cause economic chaos. We know that our reliance on oil is potentially disastrous but what we are less clear about is the terrible damage it inflicts on the countries that produce it. The people who should benefit most from the riches of oil are, quite often, harmed by it.


    Crude World offers a passionate look at some of the most awful places in the world - the violent, repressive and polluted countries where oil is extracted. Peter Maass follows the journey of oil and shows how the substance sullies so much of what it touches, poisoning land and rivers, promoting political bloodshed and creating corruption on a staggering scale. We tend to gauge the price of oil by its cost at the petrol station or its role in global warming, but Maass vividly shows an altogether different price paid by people who live in countries that are rich in petroleum but not wealth or freedom. He shows how the profits of oil benefit mainly the companies and governments that receive royalty cheques and will do more or less anything to sustain the flow of money.


    From Nigerian fishermen to Moscow oligarchs, from American generals in Iraq to environmentalists in Ecuador, from British executives to Saudi jihadists, Peter Maass connects the dots and shows how our relationship to oil is so deadly. Crude World is a magnificent piece of reportage that reveals the price others pay for the lives we lead.

  • Anglais Get the job you really want

    James Caan

    Before rising to fame on the BBC's Dragons' Den, James Caan spent thirty years setting up and running recruitment companies, placing hundreds of thousands of candidates in the jobs they really wanted.


    Now in Get The Job You Really Want James brings his experience to bear to help everyone from recent graduates to CEOs in their hunt for their dream job, from identifying the opportunity to making yourself stand out at interview and finally closing the deal on the job offer, Since publishing the first edition James has been inundated with testimonials from real readers who have used the tricks and tools in this definitive guide to jobhunting to finally land the job that they really wanted.

  • Anglais Idea man

    Paul Allen

    What's it like to start a revolution? How do you build the biggest tech company in the world? And why do you walk away from it all? Paul Allen co-founded Microsoft. Together he and Bill Gates turned an idea - writing software - into a company and then an entire industry. This title tells the story of how it came about.

  • Africa's Greatest Entrepreneurs comprises of a series of profiles on some of the most successful and dynamic businesspeople currently operating in Africa. Each chapter is dedicated to a single entrepreneur and will focus on the personality as well as the story of how they achieved their success in their particular environment or field.


    The narrative will focus on the personal success stories of these self-starters in the context of the economic and political climate of their respective markets.Issues discussed include: how they started in business; their defining moments; the challenges they faced and how they overcame them; their frustrations and achievements; what kept them going; what they learned in the process; things they would have done differently; their relationship with the political power structures; their opinions on leadership, on Africa's future; their heroes and villains, and finally, the legacy they leave behind.


    The book is inspiring and will provide a better understanding of who the real powerbrokers in Africa are. It will give an unprecedented insight into unique and successful African entrepreneurs as well as first-hand experiences of the realities of how to get things done on the continent.


    Africa's Greatest Entrepreneurs will feature an eclectic mix of the most well-known and notable entrepreneurs in Africa. Some of the names included in the book are: Kagiso Mmusi (Botswana), Victor Fotso (Cameroon), Jean Kacou Diagou (Cote d'Ivoire), Gerald Mangoua (Cote d'Ivoire), Kofi Amoabeng(Ghana), Kwabena Adjai (Ghana), Chris Kirubi (Kenya), Daniel David (Mozambique), Wale Tinubu (Nigeria), Aliko Dangote (Nigeria), Aliou Sow (Senegal), Mzi Khumalo (South Africa), Keith Kunene (SA), Ndaba Ntsele (SA), Herman Mashaba (SA), Richard Maponya (SA), Mo Ibrahim (Sudan), Reginald Mengi (Tanzania), Ali Mufuruki (Tanzania) and Wavamunno (Uganda).

  • Although we all want to help the environment, our knowledge of what are 'green' choices is often so limited that we can do more harm than good. But now a new phenomenon, 'radical transparency', the availability of complete information about all aspects of a product's history, is about to transform the power of consumers and the fate of business.


    Ecological Intelligence shows you:


    - Why a t-shirt that claims it is '100% organic cotton' may be in fact no such thing - Why it's good to buy tulips from Kenya and wine from France - That even the type of shampoo you use could affect the future of the planet Knowledge is power. By discovering how to tune your eco intelligence, Daniel Goleman shows, you can make better decisions, and a better world.

  • Two years ago, the Irish economy was still booming and the state coffers overflowing; now, the country faces an unprecedented crisis. The story of how we got from there to here is a tawdry tale of collusion, back-scratching and denial among bankers, developers, regulators and politicians.


    This is the story Shane Ross - independent Senator, long-time champion of citizens against misbehaving corporations, and Journalist of the Year 2009 - tells in The Bankers, going behind the scenes and the headlines to explain what happened, how it happened and who made it happen. They're all here: Sean FitzPatrick, Michael Fingleton and the other bank bosses; Patrick Neary and his colleagues in Ireland's failed regulatory apparatus; the property developers, whose borrowings ruined the banks, and many of whom are now personally ruined; and the politicians, whose policies helped inflate the property bubble and who have allowed the banks to dictate the terms of their bail-out. Shane Ross knows the stories of these people and what they got up to, and in The Bankers he makes sense of a scandal that will haunt Ireland for years to come.

  • During my career as a military peace-keeper and foreign aid worker I've faced many life-threatening situations. In this book I've drawn on my experiences to create a unique compilation of 'survival solutions' for people who work abroad, for adventure travellers, for those contemplating going to remoter parts of the world, or for anyone who wants to know what to do when the going gets tough.


    There is advice here on everything from being attacked by angry animals to surviving earthquakes, escaping a burning building to flying without a pilot, and much more. In the course of my work I have built an airstrip in Burundi, helped deliver a baby to a Rwandan refugee on a Congolese roadside, navigated to safety when lost in the deserts of Chad and negotiated with a rebel warlord in Darfur.


    I hope you don't have to do the same. But if things get dangerous, this guide will help you survive. Have a safe trip.

  • In the 1960s, IBM CEO Tom Watson called an executive into his office after his venture lost $10 million. Watson asked the man if he knew why he'd been called in. The man said he assumed he was being fired. Watson told him, "Fired? Hell, I spent $10 million educating you. I just want to be sure you learned the right lessons." In Billion-Dollar Lessons, Paul Carroll and Chunka Mui draw on research into more than 750 business failures to reveal the misguided tactics that mire companies again and again. There are thousands of books about successful companies but virtually none about the lessons to be learned from those that crash and burn.


    Lesson One: The Cold Hard Facts Between 1981 and 2006, 423 major publicly held U.S. companies with combined assets totaling $1.5 trillion filed for bankruptcy. Hundreds more took huge write-offs, discontinued major operations, or were acquired under duress. Again and again, companies follow the same wrong-headed strategies that brought down businesses in the past. The sub-prime mortgage crisis that cost companies tens of billions of dollars in 2007 and 2008 echoes the ill-conceived strategies that pushed Green Tree Financial and Conseco into bankruptcy years earlier. Tom Watson's executive's $10 million lesson seems cheap by comparison.


    Lesson Two: Failure Patterns Carroll and Mui found that the number one cause of failure was misguided strategy-not sloppy execution, poor leadership, or bad luck. These strategic errors fall into seven categories, including:

    * Pursuing nonexistent synergies: Quaker Oats' purchase of Snapple was supposed to capitalize on distribution synergies but instead led to a $1.7 billion write-off.

    * Moving into an "adjacent" market that isn't really adjacent: Avon decided its "culture of caring" qualified it to operate retirement homes. Subsequent write-offs totaled $545 million.

    * Buying more problems than efficiencies through misguided consolidation: Despite pioneering the discount department store years before Sam Walton came along, Ames Department Stores flubbed consolidation efforts, landing in bankruptcy twice before eventually liquidating.


    Lesson Three: Avoid Making the Same Mistakes But there's light at the end of the tunnel: Billion-Dollar Lessons provides proven methods that managers, boards, and even investors can adopt to avoid making the same mistakes. While there's no way to guarantee success, this book draws on vivid, off-the-beaten-track examples to help you avoid failure by showing you how to thoroughly assess potentially disastrous strategies before they bring your company down.


    Required Reading Think of Billion-Dollar Lessons as the flip side of Good to Great, but just as eye- opening and essential as that business classic. There's enormous value in learning from companies that lost millions (if not billions) in pursuit of strategies that led to spectacular flameouts. Everyone makes mistakes, but why make the same mistakes over and over?

  • In this New York Times bestseller and Wall Street Journal bestseller, Rickards explores the future of the international monetary system ' A fast-paced and apocalyptic look at the financial future, taking in financiers' greed, central banks' incompetence and impending Armageddon for the dollar ... Rickards may be right that the system is going wobbly. ' Financial Times The international monetary system has collapsed three times in the past hundred years. Each collapse was followed by a period of war, civil unrest, or damage to the stability of the global economy. Now James Rickards explains why another collapse is rapidly approaching. The US dollar has been the global reserve currency since the end of the Second World War. If the dollar fails the entire international monetary system will fail with it. But Washington is gridlocked, and America's biggest competitors - China, Russia, and the Middle East - are doing everything possible to end US monetary hegemony. The potential results: Financial warfare. Deflation. Hyperinflation. Market collapse. Chaos. In The Death Of Money James Rickards offers a bracing analysis of the fundamental problem: money and wealth have become ever more detached. Money is transitory and ephemeral; wealth is permanent and tangible. While wealth has real value worldwide, money may soon be worthless. The world's big players - governments, banks, institutions - will muddle through by making up new rules, and the real victims of the next crisis will be small investors. Fortunately, it is not too late to prepare for the coming death of money. In this riveting book, James Rickards shows us how. 'A terrifically interesting and useful book...fascinating' Kenneth W. Dam, former deputy secretary of the Treasury and adviser to three presidents James Rickards is the author of Currency Wars, which has been translated into eight languages and won rave reviews from the Financial Times , Bloomberg, and Politico . He is a portfolio manager at West Shore Group and an adviser on international economics and financial threats to the Department of Defense and the U.S. intelligence community. He served as facilitator of the first-ever financial war games conducted by the Pentagon. He lives in Connecticut.

  • Anglais Misbehaving

    Richard H Thaler

    RICHARD H. THALER: WINNER OF THE 2017 NOBEL PRIZE IN ECONOMICS Shortlisted for the Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award ECONOMIST, FINANCIAL TIMES and EVENING STANDARD books of the year From the renowned and entertaining behavioural economist and co-author of the seminal work Nudge , Misbehaving is an irreverent and enlightening look into human foibles. Traditional economics assumes that rational forces shape everything. Behavioural economics knows better. Richard Thaler has spent his career studying the notion that humans are central to the economy - and that we're error-prone individuals, not Spock-like automatons. Now behavioural economics is hugely influential, changing the way we think not just about money, but about ourselves, our world and all kinds of everyday decisions. Whether buying an alarm clock, selling football tickets, or applying for a mortgage, we all succumb to biases and make decisions that deviate from the standards of rationality assumed by economists. In other words, we misbehave. Dismissed at first by economists as an amusing sideshow, the study of human miscalculations and their effects on markets now drives efforts to make better decisions in our lives, our businesses, and our governments. Coupling recent discoveries in human psychology with a practical understanding of incentives and market behaviour, Thaler enlightens readers about how to make smarter decisions in an increasingly mystifying world. He reveals how behavioural economic analysis opens up new ways to look at everything from household finance to assigning faculty offices in a new building, to TV quiz shows, sports transfer seasons, and businesses like Uber. When economics meets psychology, the implications for individuals, managers and policy makers are both profound and entertaining.

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